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It takes a lot of work to make sure chickens are free from Salmonella

An important part of food safety is to avoid the bacteria Salmonella - a naturally occurring bacteria that can cause serious food poisoning and at worst lead to prolonged illness.

All chicken products from Danpo are free from Salmonella. The salmonella-free production is based on five basic steps:

The day-old chicken must be free from Salmonella when it comes to the farmer

Feed, water and bedding should be free from Salmonella

The chickens should be transported in an environment free from Salmonella

The entire production chain should be continuously inspected

Immediate action will be taken if Salmonella is discovered

A big part of the honour of having chickens without Salmonella should be attributed to the farmers, who with high hygiene standards and considerate behaviour make a great effort to prevent the bacteria entering the chicken flocks.

Salmonella is an intestinal bacteria that occurs widely in nature. It may occur in eggs, poultry, pork and beef. The bacteria can also occur in fish, raw vegetables, fruit and among some pets.

There are more than 2,500 types of Salmonella. The bacteria dies at 70-72°C, which means that it does not survive cooking.

Campylobacter

An important part of food safety is to avoid the bacteria Campylobacter – a naturally occurring bacteria that can cause serious food poisoning.

We have worked for years with fighting Campylobacter. In simple terms it is about keeping the Campylobacter bacteria from entering the poultry house to the chickens that are free from Campylobacter from birth.

Research is still being done in how to combat naturally occurring bacteria in live chickens, and our part consists, among other things, of providing advice and setting requirements for disease protection among chicken producers.

Campylobacter is a bacteria that occurs widely in nature. It can be found in birds, mammals and pets, as well as in contaminated drinking water, meat, unpasteurised milk etc.

The frequency of the bacteria varies throughout the seasons and peaks in August-September.

The bacteria dies at 70-72 °C, which means that it does not survive cooking.